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Risk: The Faithful Response to Our Rescue

At New City we talk a lot about being thankful for our rescue. Even outside of a Christian context, the word “rescue” has implications of risking, preventing, saving, or going out of one’s way for someone else. To rescue is “to free from confinement, danger, or evil” as defined by Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary. The Israelites experienced this rescue physically and spiritually when God freed them from slavery in Egypt and then gave them the Ten Commandments. In this rescue, God brought his people out of bondage and then began creating them into a new people. He led His grumbling people the long way, with a reluctant leader, but God knew the risk would pay off.

When we think about our personal rescue stories, it can be easy to forget that our rescue came with a cost.

And they spit on him and took the reed and struck him on the head. And when they had mocked him, they stripped him of the robe and put his own clothes on him and led him away to crucify him.” (Matt 27:30, 31).

No matter if your rescue story comes from growing up in church, or coming to faith in a desperate place, this was the cost for all believers.  God risked to rescue us and continues to risk by pursuing His children. This is why risk is a core value at New City–it is a core part of our story.

Not only did God risk to rescue us, but we are called to risk for others. We read in scripture that, “greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends” (John 15:13). Risk stems from love. “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, so that those who believe might have life, life everlasting.” (John 3:16). Risking is not about making your schedule more full to check the “love your neighbors box.” Risk involves seeing God’s heart for your neighbors, for people in need, for people who do not look like you, and taking on that heart of love yourself. When you start to see people how God sees them, your schedule, reputation, and comfortability dwindle and finding a way to help others becomes more important.

In Acts 10 Peter has the vision of a sheet with unclean animals coming down and repeatedly hears, “do not call what is clean unclean.” Peter’s first reaction was confusion and rejection because his understanding of what he could eat had been set for years. However, God uses this vision to lead Peter into a risky call; namely, to invite outsiders into God’s story. Through visions and the Spirit’s leading, God gives Peter not only an image of the coming risk, but a person.

The Spirit led Cornelius, a God-fearing Roman soldier, to call for Peter to hear about this vision. This is bold for Cornelius to do because of his position in the Roman army and because of the fact that Peter was a Jew. After a vision warning Peter that Cornelius will call for him to come, Peter cannot help but notice the Spirit’s working. When Peter sees God undoubtedly at work, the risk becomes less of a fearful experience, and more of a faithful call. “You yourselves know how unlawful it is for a Jew to associate with or to visit anyone of another nation, but God has shown me that I should not call any person common or unclean” (Acts 10:28). After this encounter between Peter and Cornelius, Peter preached the Good News to Gentiles and they received the Holy Spirit. Peter and Cornelius both listened to God, stepped out in faith and took risks, which in turn resulted in the salvation of many.

The Gentiles were not Jewish, which means they were not considered in the family of God’s people. For most of us, this means Peter and Cornelius are a part of our rescue story. This week reflect on your rescue story or on seasons when you ran from God. What did God bring into your life to bring you back to Him? How can you be that person for others this week? Pray for the person after you in line, start up a conversation with someone who doesn’t look like you, be the first to apologize in an argument, pray for opportunities to risk for God. Risking is what Jesus calls us to when he says, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me” (Matt 16:24). Risk is not just a core value of a church; it is the call of following Christ.

Reflection Questions:

  • What resource(s) to you have excess of (food, money, time, clothes, etc.) and how can you give it away to people in need?
  • What keeps you from stepping out of your comfort zone to help, to encourage, or to share your faith with others?
  • Read Luke 18:18-30 and reflect on where you see risk in this passage.

 

Mary Katherine Wildeman,  New City Stories Contributor 

Rest and Risk: Connecting Our Core Values

“…nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will.” Matthew 26:39 ESV

Resting and risking are two of New City’s core values. From my experience, these are the two core values that are uncommon to most churches. The other two core values are love and send, two commonly heard values in a church— to love God and one another (Lk 10:27) and to “go and make disciples of all nations”(Matt 28:19). This leaves me asking two questions: What scriptures point to resting and risking? And how do rest and risk relate to each other in the Christian life?

Resting is not New City’s idea, resting is God’s idea. God initiates rest in the creation story in Genesis 2:2-3: “So God blessed the seventh day and made it holy, because on it God rested from all his work that he had done in creation.” In Matthew 11:28 Jesus says, “Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” However, this verse is not about giving up all responsibilities and sipping lemonade on an island. Jesus continues saying, “Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.” There is still a responsibility for Christians in the resting, but it is a responsibility given by Christ, exemplified in Christ, and fueled by rest in Christ. This is why Jesus says come to him–not only is our rest found in His presence, but our purpose is found in His presence, too.

Risk is seen often when Jesus calls his first disciples to leave their current jobs and lives in order to follow him. Believe it or not, Jesus did get a few rejections. There was a rich man who asked Jesus, “What good deed must I do to have eternal life?”(Matt 19:17) Jesus responds, “If you would be perfect, go, sell what you possess and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me” (Matt 19:21). Jesus is asking the man to risk his current state, his status, and his financial security before following Jesus. Scripture records that although this man followed many of the commandments, “when the young man heard this he went away sorrowful, for he had great possessions”(Matt 19:22). The risk was too much for him.

We see Jesus ask the same thing of Simon Peter and Andrew. While they were fishing, Jesus says “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men” (Matt 4:19). Immediately they dropped their nets and followed Jesus. They left their current state of fishing, which was their job. They left their financial security and status and followed Jesus. They took the risk.While scripture shows us rest and risk separately, how do the two relate to one another? It reminds me of trying to get back into exercising. A lot of times when I have not exercised in a while I think, “what’s something I can do for exercise that won’t make me sweat?” I hope you laughed at that, because this goes against the very nature of exercising. What I really want is the effect of exercising without the requirements. The only requirement of exercise that you probably should break a sweat, even if it’s only a little.

This is similar to how rest and risk relate to one another. If we only take risks out of our own wants, ideas, and dreams, then how is this following Jesus? Does this not just become making a name for ourselves? Like the rich man, we think we fulfill the requirements to follow Jesus but this kind “risk” only leads to worry, exhaustion, and a life of trying to prove ourselves.

This is where rest comes in. Just like how exercise requires at least some sweat, risking requires resting in God. And vice-versa, resting in God requires taking risks. This sounds counter-intuitive and maybe even impossible, but we see this in several biblical leaders–especially Jesus.

I think most people would agree that giving one’s life for another is the greatest risk. Scripture tells us that “greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends” (John 15:13). When Jesus is with his friends the night before his own death, he goes to the presence of the Father. Jesus is about to risk and lose his life, and he comes to God for rest. Finding seclusion with a few disciples nearby and “going a little farther he fell on his face and prayed, saying, ‘My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will.’” Jesus falls down in exhaustion and asks God if there is another way. In a time when Jesus is looking for rest, he confesses to the difficulty of the risk, then confesses of His need of his Father. Jesus comes to God wanting another way and leaves knowing that this is the way God has planned.

Jesus praying in the Garden of Gethsemane

We see Jesus take on a risk, and when he goes to the Father for rest he finds his purpose again, “not as I will, but as you will”. This is why we need to continue to rest even when we step out on a limb and risk. We cannot just rest when life is easy, rather the most important time to rest in God is when we are no longer sure of what we are doing. This is the very moment when I try and contrive my own plan, convince myself that my way is God’s way, or try to do it in my own strength. In these times, be reminded of Jesus, fallen on his face in the garden, resting and risking, “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will.”

Questions to Reflect on This Week:

  • In what ways are you risking this week?
  • Where are you acting in your own strength?
  • How do you best rest in the presence of God?
  • How can you implement this resting into your areas of risk this week?
  • Who can you share your experience of resting and risking with this week?

 

Mary Katherine Wildeman, New City Stories Contributor 

 

New City’s Heartbeat: Our Core Values and Questions

Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest.  Matthew 11:28 NRSV

When my wife Kristin and I heard God’s call to plant New City Church here in Lexington, we specifically heard God call us to begin a community marked by rest.  As we developed this vision and listened for God’s intent in and for our ministry, we landed on four core values of Love, Rest, Risk, and Send that we utilize to lead all of our decision making. I believe that not only knowing who we are (landing our core values) is essential but that these specific DNA markers have been God ordained for ministering to our context. I have seen unconditional “love” draw hurting and burnt people into our community, “rest” attract exhausted and performing Bible-belt Christians, “risk” free us up to think outside the box, and “send” get tested early in our lifetime as we are generous to other churches and as we look to plant new expressions.

New City Church

As I personally continue to wrestle with these 4 markers of New City Church, I asked myself some questions about the foundation of this community of God. I share these with you so you can marinate in what your community is built on; you can utilize these questions in a huddle, during your quiet time journaling or praying, or even in a conversation with another New City family member. Here they are:

            Love                               

  • What is the root of my love for others?
  • How is my love expanding the hospitality in my life?
  • How is my love speaking dignity into everyone around us?
  • How am I complicating loving others? How have I simplified and missed out on loving someone in a unique way?
  • Who is someone in my life I’m not excited to love on right now?

            Rest

  • How do I rest well?
  • Where in my life am I competing, comparing, or striving?
  • What do I see God creating in my life? How can I partner in what He is creating instead of stirring something up myself?
  • How am I living in the reality of abiding as portrayed in John 15?
  • How am I experiencing the truth of rest taught in Matthew 11:28-30?

            Risk

  • Where in my life am I quick to “play it safe” or choose comfortability?
  • Who might God be asking me to risk on?
  • What is something I am holding as a “sacred cow” that I might need to risk and give up?
  • What question do I not want to be asked OR need to answer that I might need to engage in?
  • How am I engaging in dark, risky areas in our community?
  • What do I see the Spirit leading me into that freaks me out?

            Send

  • How does my life express the Great Commission found in Matthew 28:16-20?
  • How am I celebrating sending in this season?
  • Do I live a “commissioned” lifestyle?
  • How can I be radically generous this season?
  • How could I be a part of New City’s sending in this season?

My prayer is that you would grow in ownership, understanding, and comfortability with these concepts as you dive into them. My desire is that our entire community, every brother and sister, would make these their own as we partner in ministry together in 2018.

Zach Meerkreebs, New City Church Head Planter