The God of the Process

“But now, O LORD, you are our Father; we are the clay, and you are our potter; we are all the work of your hand.” Isaiah 64:8 ESV

Years ago, I found myself in a season of deep wrestling as I began to experience not a crisis of faith, but rather a crisis of truth. I had more questions than answers as I struggled to discern what the Lord was asking of me and desperately tried to attain it in my own life. I viewed my walk with the Lord as a static state, being either totally right or completely wrong – and this drove me to live in utter fear. I was paralyzed at the thought that any one decision or belief could completely define my sanctification.

In the midst of this battle, I felt the Lord speak to me one day, not as an audible voice, but as an internal impression on the heart. He said, “I could have snapped my fingers and made the rocking chair appear, but instead I took the time to carve it into one.” Immediately, I got a picture of Jesus as a carpenter, surrounded by wood shavings, carving away at edges with a plane and drawing corners with a compass. Every morning he awakes early and begins where he left off the night before. Day by day, week by week, what was formerly a rough piece of wood, full of knots and splinters, becomes a well-crafted and designed piece of furniture. Now whether or not the people of Jesus’ day had rocking chairs, the point was this- Our God is a God of the process.

As not only Christians, but as American Christians, we are so drawn toward accomplishment and finality. We crave a finished product but often begrudgingly go through the steps of accomplishing that finished product only out of a place of necessity. When we carry this mentality into our faith, we tend to view the sanctification process as this terribly mundane and laborsome series of hoops we have to jump through to finally achieve righteousness. The thing is, our God is not the CEO of a company and He is not a drill sergeant for the military. Our God is a God who actually enjoys the process in which we become like Him. He is the Potter who takes the clay into His hands and fashions us into His image.

When we fall into that familiar pattern of thinking that God will only be pleased with us at the end of our life, when (if we’ve played our Christian cards right) we will perhaps be slightly more mature in the faith, we must remind ourselves of the nature of the Father. Micah 7:18 tells us that God actually delights in mercy. This means that God finds joy when He is able to forgive us and give us the love and strength that we don’t deserve. It is no difficult thing for God to hate the sin that entangles us and yet find joy in restoring us to fullness. Psalm 102 says, “The Lord is merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love.”

Do the Scriptures not make the case that every season is of profit? Would Moses have been prepared for his confrontation in Egypt if he had not born the shepherding season of the wilderness? Would Peter have taught his Acts 2 sermon with the same boldness if he had not denied Jesus and been mercifully redeemed? Why was Jesus born as a child through Mary and not sent as a fully grown man? Because we serve a God who delights in the process.

You see, our lives are not viewed from the throne as a static state, as if God has a good list and a naughty list. The Lord created life and time and space so that we could go on a long journey with Him of maturing and growing in our own sanctification. This is why Ephesians describes us as the workmanship of Christ. He is weaving you and me into a beautiful tapestry, filled with elaborate color and varying texture. With each season of trial and season of joy, each failure and each step toward holiness, He is threading the needle of maturity, looking forward to the day when the tapestry will be finished, yes, but finding delight every seam and stitch along the way.

Audra Lynn, a worship leader from IHOP-KC, wrote a song that encapsulates this:

“How I long to see the picture finished

Painted as a perfect portrait

Void of all the mysteries of my life

The cares of life bend every corner Taking me in wrong directions

Can I walk despite the pain and strife?

But what is life without all the yearnings of the heart?

And who am I to doubt all you have in store for me?”

 

In Closing, here are some questions we can ask ourselves this week:

  • -How can we partner with God in embracing our own unique process in this season?
  • -Do we have confidence that the Lord values our journey toward maturity?
  • -Do we find joy of fear in anticipating a lifelong journey with the Lord?

 

Melody Hickey, New City Stories Contributor