Advent Fulfilled: The Incarnation

“…that life was revealed, and we have seen it and we testify and declare to you the eternal life that was with the Father and was revealed to us…so that our joy may be complete” 1 John 1:2,4 (CSB)

This week of Advent celebrates the Incarnation of Christ. Nearly everyone recognizes the incarnation as the Christmas narrative: Jesus born of Mary, who was a virgin, in a manger in the little town of Bethlehem. The details of this historical event are found in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke as well as recounted in famous Christmas Carols and the Charlie Brown Christmas Special, so I will not relate them here. This storyline has become so familiar during this season of the year, that people hear it often with little more than a sense of comfort.

Instead, I wish to point our eyes and hearts to a third narrative of Jesus’ birth. This passage recounts none of the details, but conveys the profound meaning of the Incarnation.

What was from the beginning, what we have heard, what we have seen with our eyes, what we have observed and have touched with our hands, concerning the word of life —  that life was revealed, and we have seen it and we testify and declare to you the eternal life that was with the Father and was revealed to us —  what we have seen and heard we also declare to you, so that you may also have fellowship with us; and indeed our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ. We are writing these things so that our joy may be complete. 1 John 1:1-4 (CSB)

Let us unpack this passage a little. Advent calls us to reflect with a renewed interest in the miracle of Christmas; the miracle of the gospel. Advent softens our heart and draws us into a richer relationship with God, if we let it. So, there are some deep truths here and I ask that you sit with each one of them just a moment rather than breezing through them. Take time to meditate on the implication of each revelation.

Jesus (referred to here as “the word of life”) preexisted all of creation because he “was from the beginning.”
Jesus was present “with the Father” in relationship with Him from eternity.
Jesus did not come to life; He IS life. He is “the eternal life” revealed to us.
Jesus came to us here within His creation as a man who could be “touched with … hands”, “seen with … eyes”, and “heard” as a human being.
The entire purpose in the incarnation and in John’s testimony about Jesus’ birth is for our “joy [to] be complete.”
Jesus invites us into “fellowship … with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ.”

There is simply too much here and too few words available to flesh out all that these four short verses offer. I trust that if you took the time to reflect on each of the assertions I drew out of the passage, then the Holy Spirit has spoken something special to you. For me, I am awestruck as I contemplate God stooping down to my broken existence by coming in the flesh in order to for me to be in relationship with Him (Romans 8:3). Who am I to receive such an invitation? What have I done to deserve this? No one. Nothing. And yet…

I have not, nor can I, make my way to God. Every other religion tells me I have to find a way to reach Him. Every other religion has special people who tell me what to do and how to behave to get to God. The Christmas story, the Incarnation of Christ, destroys that whole paradigm of earning eternal life. God came to me … to you … to us … as a vulnerable baby (1 Peter 1:1). He did everything required for me to be in fellowship with God here and now and evermore. He is not only in the Christmas narrative, but in me – incarnate.

By Greg Napier, New City Stories Contributor